Part I -- ROOTS AND STRATEGIES OF THE COLD WAR BEFORE REAGAN

Chapter 1 - America's Freedom Faith and The Cold War

[Rights, Independence, Sacred Honor] We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, that to secure these rights governments are instituted among men. We . . . solemnly publish and declare, that these colonies are and of right ought to be free and independent states. . . . And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine providence, we mutually pledge our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor. (heading added)
The Jefferson Memorial’s second panel cites Jefferson on God, religion, and the “free mind”:
[Freedom of Religion] Almighty God hath created the mind free. All attempts to influence it by temporal punishments or burthens . . . are a departure from the plan of the Holy Author of our religion. . . . No man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship or ministry or shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief, but all men shall be free to profess and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion. I know but one code of morality for men whether acting singly or collectively. (heading added)
The Jefferson Memorial’s third panel cites the following words on God, liberty, slavery and education:
[Liberty versus Slavery] God who gave us life gave us liberty. Can the liberties of a nation be secure when we have removed a conviction that these liberties are the gift of God? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just, that his justice cannot sleep forever. Commerce between master and slave is despotism. Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate than that these people are to be free. Establish a law for educating the common people. This is the business of the state and on a general plan. (heading added)
The Jefferson Memorial’s fourth panel provides the following words from Jefferson on change:
[Progress, Change, an Open Mind] I am not an advocate for frequent changes in laws and constitutions, but laws and institutions must go hand in hand with the progress of the human mind. As that becomes more developed, more enlightened, as new discoveries are made, new truths discovered and manners and opinions change, with the change of circumstances, institutions must advance also to keep pace with the times. We might as well require a man to wear still the coat which fitted him when a boy as civilized society to remain ever under the regimen of their barbarous ancestors. (heading added)13
Abraham Lincoln. The American people rank Abraham Lincoln as the “American Abraham” and America’s first Republican president as the most admired of all the nation’s political leaders. A man who wrestled with the demons of slavery and civil war, his words of faith on equality, freedom, union, war, reconciliation, tragedy, and hope stand as timeless witness to American exceptionalism. Three Lincoln statements reviewed here are included in Lincoln’s Words Inscribed on the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., dedicated in 1922.
 
The first is Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address—1863 of November 19, 1863, as inscribed on the memorial in its entirety as follows:
[Conceived in Liberty] Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
[Unfinished Work, Great Task, New Birth] But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—we can not hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. (headings added)14
[Book pg. 11]

Pages